Flyfish´s FAQ


Can you tell me more sbout tippet and how it is used and what function it serves?I don't mean to sound dumb, but I honestly do not know and would like to find out more of this material. Thanks so much,
Hi, below I have added a small URL wich shows the outfit named and assembled. The tippet is the last part of the fly line (line and leader+tippet) tied to the fly. It is normally a level nylon line, eventually like silicone/teflone treated like Stroft or whatever make or fluorocarbon. Its diametre is often depending on the size of the fly used and what fish you are fishing for. Fluorocarbon is used in very clear waters. It is also the part you change when you change to a different size of fly, or when it has become short after many fly changes or wear.
Normally the the diametre is measured in inches or millimetres or in braking strain as the exemples: 6x is about 0.14 m.m. 5x is about 0.16 m.m. 4x is about 0.18 m.m. and 3x is 0.21 m.m. etc. For all knots, please see the URL with the outfits etc. here: http://www.flyfield.com/davetips.htm Hope this helps a bit.
Tight Lines.

CAN YOU OFFER ANY INFORMATION ABOUT FLY FISHING IN DENMARK? ( I'm from the states and I'm traveling to Denmark in April)
Hi J, fly fishing is most certainly possible there in slow flowing
rivers for both brown trout and grayling. Also the coast fishing for sea trout can be worth while. I'll try to find a contact for you.
Tight Lines.

WOULD LIKE TO KNOW SOMETHING ABOUT FISHING AND FISHING TECHNIQUES IN SWEDEN, FOR PIKE INCLUDING FLY FISHING?
Hi A, nice to hear from you and, - as you so apt put it, the pike fishing i Sweden is often performed with crude fishing gear. But something that has developed gradually is the fishing for pike with fly gear. Normally a 9-10 feet rod for the #6-7 intermediate line does the trick. With flies about 10 cm long and dressed in tinsel and
flaschabou draping like a long skirt tied in on the middle of the hook shank. Blue/silver and Brown/silver are very effective colors. Size #2.0 hook straight eye, long shank. The fly below is a Brown/Silver variant on the Blue/Silver "Lima-Pelle" from Finland, also very effective in Sweden.
In the area you ask about there should be good pike waters and coarse angling in Göta Canal. However the sport fishing area chairman is S. D. and he certainly can help you with more waters. 
For many though, lake Sommen (specimen charr) and lake Vättern (landlocked Atlantic salmon and brown trout, charr and grayling) are most interesting in this area together with lake Roxen, which often produces good fishing for zander. But there are also some streams around Rimforsa and Kisa. But you have to be a bit more specific for more details.
Hope this helped a little.
Regards.

IS THERE A WAY TO FISH WITH MORE THAN ONE FLY TIED TO THE LEADER?
Hi Mr D,
for what I know, the Aussies and NZ-fly fishermen use the method of
tying the dropper to the hook bend on the fly initially tied on the leader. In that way the flies can be tied rather close to each other and do not tangle easily.
In UK and other European countries they use the method of tying one, two or more flies to the leader. Nylon is tied along the leader with for ex. surgeons knots which are easily tied to the leader perhaps some 30-50 cm apart and which can be trimmed as short as one wants it for the flies to be tied to it along the leader. 
Hope this helped a little

I KNOW THAT THERE ARE THOUSANDS OF LAKES AND RIVERS THERE, SO I WOULD LIKE TO KNOW SOMETHING ABOUT FISHING THERE. IS THE FISHING FREE, WHAT KIND OF FISH CAN YOU FIND, WHAT MINIMAL EQUIPMENT DO YOU NEED?
Hi T, 
Certainly you can fish along the trail, but you would need fishing permits. As the local fishing permits often have different prices the best solution is to buy all the permits together with a map over the area before you go fishing. For a shorter period this shouldn't be too expensive.
I think that we could also be of service if you just fax my former office with your itinerary so they can help you getting in touch with those in charge of the fishing permits.
For fly fishing I would suggest a rod #4-5 9 foot and four-piece and a WF6F-line to overload the rod a little for mastering the wind that sometimes occur. But if you are an experienced fly fisherman I would suggest the opposite approach and choose the WF # 4 line instead. Because a skilled fisherman can create higher line speed with narrower loops and a thinner line cuts through the wind better.
Good flies would be normal wetflys and nymphs. The caddis is a winner and also Klinkhamer variants. But do try the odd Montana also - it is strange but the fish sometimes take that also. Suppose it's because black and red are good colors in Lappish waters. I also like Double Legs and Tjuonna Black, especially for grayling.
Although you naturally could use just a combo rod or a spinning outfit, the multi part fly rod is my favorite.
The fish you would catch are grayling, charr, and brown trout. (But there are also perch and northern pike and at some places you could find real specimen roach)
Hope this helped a little.

ANY SUGGESTIONS ON FLOAT TUBES AND BELLY BOATS?
Hi J,
yes I'm familiar with float tubes and I like the round ones better.
Although the U-boats are easier to get into, they do tend to float lower so my fly west gets wet a lot. Maneuvering the round one is also easier I think - I mean you get around quicker for aiming the cast in a new direction. Well that´s my thoughts anyway. Cheers.

HI, DON'T YOU THINK THAT THE MODERN MATERIALS IN FLY RODS MAKE THE DIFFERENCES SMALLER BETWEEN FLY RODS OF DIFFERENT MAKERS ETC?
Hi Mr P,
You are quite right I think in that the difference is hardly possible to notice between good quality rods, and also in that the graphite probably by far is the best material yet for blanks. I have tried bamboo like in split cane rods, glass fiber, graphite in different modulus and tapers and also boron, together with various other designs with polished epoxy covered blanks and mate finished lighter designs. And then there are those that have a web of hoop strengthening fibers in criss-cross layers like in Diamondback from US and Tri Cast from UK. 

And all this confirms what you say. The sensitivity and performance in our modern rods is outstanding.
But for me practicing fly fishing I sometimes find the visual means of detecting the bite from fish more exiting, and therefore I'm not so much relying on to feeling the bite. The other thing - as I mentioned previously - is the need for me to have the possibility to "overload" the rod without the loss of power in casting and sometimes perhaps also to abruptly change the direction in the cast. I have felt it easier to do this with fly rods built in more pieces that two. I mean, like the golf club you would need a blank that withstrains the torsion/twisting in the tube of the blank to be able to direct the ball, and I feel it to be a little similar in my case. The true tracking ability and hoop strength together with a good taper are the most important factors for me. But again I agree with you: to feel the bite or just trout grabbing the fly is exquisite.
Thanks also for your kind reply earlier on.

Ps. By the way. I really have tried to insert small evenly spaced,
tapered plugs in a graphite blank-and it made big difference. But as You so aptly noted. It also got a little too heavy for my liking. But the casting performance I really liked.

HI, MY NAME IS A, AND I'M INTERESTED IN FLY FISHING. HOWEVER I KNOW ABSOLUTELY NOTHING ABOUT IT.

Hi A,
I'll come back to you with some more, perhaps closer by to you, but for short I'll give a rough (perhaps awkward but short) outline on the practice.
So here if you like I have made some small comments on fly fishing:
Fly fishing is mainly done with a fly rod and line. The casting motion differs from bait casting or whatever by the line being the weight instead of something concentrated to a lure or bait in the end of a line. This means that the line has to be whipped forward and backward to gain speed to ultimately stretch out and deliver the fly out on or in the water.
This practice, slinging the line, is best illustrated by
tying a yarn to a stick and by whipping that you get the idea. One of the secrets in succeeding is by creating a loop on the line.
(I have an animated gif on my index page which illustrates the moves)

For delivering the fly out on the water, you need a softer and thinner tip (called the leader) for dampening the velocity of the fly. (A fly tied directly to the fly line would be knocking the fish, if not shocking..:~)
The leader is often tapered similar to the fly line tip and can go down in diameter as far as to .10mm.

Normally you use a #4 - 9 foot rod for a Weight Forward line #5, but for beginning the practice I would suggest somewhat heavier line. This quicker gives the feel of the timing.

For flies there are dries, wets, nymphs, streamers, lures etc. They are manmade copies of ants, beetles, may flies, caddis flies, chironomids and other insects. They can also imitate fish like the sculpin etc.

For imitating hatching may flies you often let the fly lie still on the water. The caddis on the other hand can be twitched now and then.
Streamers that imitate small fish, can be fished in jerking motions or being pulled continuously with both hands and the rod tucked under your one arm.
A dragon fly nymph like the Muddler minnow (also a fish imitation-the muddler) can be fished with pulsating jerks etc...

The fly line is only some 25 yards so you need a backing. This all is stored on the fly reel. Often a single action reel and nowadays preferably quiet.

Of course there are zillion other things like in all practice, but I hope this will give you a hint.
Cheers
Harry Salmgren

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